Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 5, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm BST

11:00 am
this is bbc news and these are the top stories. britain dismisses russian claims that chemical gas which killed more than 70 people in syria came from a rebel ammunition store. all the evidence i have seen and suggest it is the president assad regime that didn't live a full knowledge that they were using illegal weapons. the eu's chief negotiator tells the european parliament that no deal on brexit would have very serious consequences for britain — and also for the european union. i'm simon mccoy live from westminster abbey, where the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend a "service of hope", remembering the victims of last month's attack in westminster. among the congregation will be those in the emergency services that attended the event, those who lost loved ones, the relatives of those
11:01 am
who were murdered. and also prince harry. failure to expel ken livingstone from the party over his hitler remarks ‘shames us all‘, says labour's deputy leader tom watson. also this hour, tackling the environmental damage caused by some diesel engines. diesel car owners could get compensation from the government if cities adopt new charges to tackle pollution. that was hinted by theresa may. members of the public are being given an opportunity to test a d riverless given an opportunity to test a driverless shuttle bus for the first time. the un security council is to hold emergency talks following a suspected chemical attack in syria which has left at least 72 people dead, including children. the assad regime denies
11:02 am
using chemical weapons. syria's ally russia has blamed the rebels accusing them of storing toxic agents in a factory which was hit by a syrian air strike. sarah corker reports. it includes some distressing images. hundreds of innocent syrians, including many children, struggling to breathe after a suspected chemical attack in idlib province. distressing images and evidence that will no doubt dominate emergency talks held by the un security council later today. global leaders have called for a rapid investigation into what happened here. some of the injured were treated across the border in turkey. medics wore face masks to protect themselves from the toxic gases. translation: we were affected by the gas. we couldn't stand up. i felt dizzy and sick. i suffered from shortness of breath. i couldn't breathe. this apparent chemical strike
11:03 am
on a rebel held town has brought furious international reaction. the us, britain and france have all blamed the syrian government for the attack. i'm appalled by the reports that there's been a chemical weapons and attack on a town south of idlib, allegedly by the syrian regime. we condemn the use of chemical weapons in all circumstances. if proven, this will be further evidence of the barbarism of the syrian regime. using chemical weapons is a war crime. president assad's regime denied launching tuesday's attack, echoing denials it has made over the course of syria's six year civil war. and just as doctors were treating those who survived, the hospital was hit by an airstrike. the attack will overshadow an international conference in brussels later, discussing aid effort in syria. thousands of civilians are still trapped by fighting. what effective action can
11:04 am
the international community now take to prevent a repeat of this? russia is claiming the chemicals used in the attack came from a rebel held store on the ground. let's get more about the russian account from our correspondent, sarah rainsford who is in st petersburg. the russian military put out a statement at 2am in the morning. the spokesman for the armed forces here, his argument, his explanation for what happened is what you have heard, that the syrian air force was targeting a rebel ammunitions store and it said in the statement that all the same site as this store was all the same site as this store was a production facility for weapons using a poisonous substance. weapons
11:05 am
filled with the poisonous substance. russia explaining what happened and said it was not a deliberate chemical attack by serbian forces, by its ally president assad and its forces, but chemicals were released and the injuries that have been the responsibilities of rebel forces and not the syrian government. the bush of chemical weapons in khan sheikhoun came just before an international conference in brussels. the british foreign secretary boris johnson brussels. the british foreign secretary borisjohnson dismissed that russian suggestion that the rebels were to blame for the attack. i have seen absolutely nothing to suggest or, rather, to lead us to think that it is anything but the regime. all the evidence i have, and there may be more to come out on this... what have you seen? the evidence i have seen suggests that this was the assad regime who did it in the full knowledge
11:06 am
that they were using illegal weapons in a barbaric attack on their own people. i would like to see those culpable pay a price for this. what is the price? i do not see how a government like that can continue to have any kind of legitimate administration of the people of syria. our correspondent ben james is monitoring events from beirut and joins us now. what will be done, what can be done to get to the bottom of who was behind this? the line that does not seem to be working. can you hear me?
11:07 am
u nfortu nately we have seem to be working. can you hear me? unfortunately we have got some technical issues with the line to ben in beirut. we will try to go to him later. the european parliament is voting on a resolution laying out the terms it believes the eu must demand during brexit negotiations. it says the uk must honour its financial liabilities and abide by eu standards if it wants to maintain a close trading relationship with the bloc. our correspondent dan johnson is at the european parliament in strasbourg. tell us more about what the demands would be. mdp is from about what they think the main principles should be. the main priority to echo what we held last week from the european council, from the heads of government from the other european nations. they are talking about rights for european citizens and uk citizens living abroad, hot access
11:08 am
to health care, pensions, wealthier and education. the situation on the irish border which is a priority that needs to be settled. and the way that the uk is going to settle its account when it believes the eu, exactly how much money it will pay. at times this debate has been bad—tempered this morning. at one stage the president had to call for calm and say he did not want the atmosphere to descend into a football stadium. one person who gave an impassioned speech this morning was nigel farage, the ukip mep, he leads one of the groups here. he said the demands on britain we re here. he said the demands on britain were unreasonable. you are behaving like the mafia, like we are a hostage, we are not. we are free to go. this... i know... i do understand. sorry, mr fryers. --
11:09 am
sorry nigel farage. if you are talking about the mafia, i find that unacceptable. i do understand. applause ido applause i do understand mr president. applause i do understand mr presidentlj understand i do understand mr president.” understand national sensitivities, i will change it to gangsters. that is how we are being treated. some passion and bad—tempered displayed this morning. lots of debate. in the last couple of minutes we have held that the draft resolution laid down by the european parliament have been approved by meps. that lays down the negotiating deadlines, what they think our priorities. and the timeline that should be followed. measuring what was said last week by
11:10 am
the european council that there should be significant process on the talks about how the uk leads the eu before talking about a new trade relationship. there were some more expressions of sadness about the fa ct expressions of sadness about the fact that the uk is leading and that in some sense could weaken the eu. john in some sense could weaken the eu. jothuncker, in some sense could weaken the eu. john juncker, the commission president spoke this morning and said this was a strong moment in history. translation: the choice of the united kingdom to leave the european union is indeed a choice that will bring an end to the eu we re that will bring an end to the eu were 28 members and that makes a side, profoundly sad. the choice of the british people does not fit into the british people does not fit into the march of history, not a european history or global history. the other
11:11 am
tea m history or global history. the other team and we heard from in strasberg was michel barnier, he is the chief negotiator who has been put in place. he will sit down on the other side of the table from the british negotiating team and hammer out the detail. he will take into account everything that is recommended in these guidelines laid down by the parliament. he spoke this morning more about the timeline that he thinks should be followed as these negotiations progress. it makes clear that the uk government will push for parallel negotiations. this isa very push for parallel negotiations. this is a very risky approach. to succeed, we need on the contrary to devote the first phase of negotiations exclusively to reaching an agreement for the principles of exit. we're not trying to be
11:12 am
tactical or to create difficulties for the uk. tactical or to create difficulties forthe uk. on the tactical or to create difficulties for the uk. on the contrary, tactical or to create difficulties forthe uk. on the contrary, it tactical or to create difficulties for the uk. on the contrary, it is an essential condition to maximise out an essential condition to maximise our chances of reaching an agreement together with an two years. which is very short. the draft guidelines now approved by the board that is taking place in strasberg this morning also says there should be a transitional period but of no longer than three ears. that is something that theresa may has been talking about. she talked about the stage of introducing the new relationships. on some sense the two site are getting closer together and these guidelines have been approved and laid down by the european parliament. they are not binding and it is for the european council, the other side of the european union, the representatives of all heads of government of the other 27 countries, they will steer the negotiations but mps will get a
11:13 am
chance to vote, meps will get the chance to vote, meps will get the chance to vote on the final deal onceit chance to vote on the final deal once it is agreed in two years. some breaking news about lloyds bank, we can hear that it is closing another 100 branches with the loss of more than 200 jobs. that is according to the united union. that comes according to the united union. that co m es two according to the united union. that comes two days after it was revealed that the taxpayer stake in the lloyds banking group has been cut to below 2%. the government is continuing to sell its shares. the latest... more than £20 billion are now returned to the government since the £20.73 now returned to the government since the £20.3 billion loan at the height of the financial crisis. roger close another 100 branches with the loss of more than 200 jobs. —— lloyds
11:14 am
will close. north korea has fired a medium—range ballistic missile, which landed in the sea ofjapan. the launch, close to the port of sinpo, comes on the eve of a visit by china's president, xijinping, to the united states to meet president trump. the two will discuss, among other things, how to curb north korea's nuclear weapons programme. mr trump said recently that if beijing didn't help, the us would do it alone. our correspondent steve evans is in the south korean capital seoul. he gave us the latest. this launch was a relatively unspectacular. the distance were shot, only about 60 kilometres or a0 miles. last month for instance, north korea let loose for missiles simultaneously. what is significant about the launch was the timing. president trump and the president of china and about to meet in florida with north korea right at the top of
11:15 am
the agenda. president trump wants china to rein in north korea. if it doesn't, america will do it alone, thatis doesn't, america will do it alone, that is the message. at the moment american troops are exercising alongside south korean troops. despite chinese calls for these exercises to be halted. president trump says his policy towards north korea is very different from the president obama policy. it is not clear exactly how. what is true is that talk about military action against north korea is much louder. and so is concern here which is well within range of conventional north korean artillery. some military a nalysts say korean artillery. some military analysts say there is a real danger that missteps and foolish acts could lead to a second korean war. labour has failed the jewish community by not expelling ken livingstone from the party —
11:16 am
according to the chief rabbi, ephraim mirvis. we will talk about that in a moment. the former mayor of london was yesterday given a further one—year suspension for claiming hitler supported let us talk about the service of hope that will be attended by the duke of duchess of cambridge. it is called a service of hope and reconciliation, held for the victims of the westminster attack. around 2000 people are expected to attend the event at westminster abbey. families of the victims, faith leaders, and members of the emergency services will be guests. let us go live to westminster abbey. thank you very much, it is a multi—faith service and will be part of the focus of this as london and the country tries to come to terms
11:17 am
with what happened just a few hundred jobs away one fortnight ago today. westmeath —— with me is the dean of westminster, the very reverend john hall, you will be addressing the congregation, so soon after the event. what are you hoping to achieve? so many people here would have been victims or would have been connected to the families. and people who were injured. we need to reflect on the particular event itself and what happened. one thing i reflect upon as the reaction of people immediately after a disaster of that kind of cars. the number of people who respond in the first instance, that is the extraordinary thing. we will remember them. and we will give thanks for the life and commend them to god. that is one clear aspect. we are also global. by what it is about. it looks like a
11:18 am
lone actor doing something to people he had never met before. what does that say? it leaves us bill will do. i want to reflect on the bewilderment as well. then we need to move through. —— it leaves us build it. it so many flowers and messages on westminster bridge, messages of hope and commitment, we stand together and commitment, we stand together and are not afraid. that is from all the faith communities. the day after the faith communities. the day after the attack, the muslim leaders repudiated this act. this is not pa rt repudiated this act. this is not part of ourfaith. repudiated this act. this is not part of our faith. many of them will be here and together we see that. part of our faith. many of them will be here and together we see thatm was to an extent a normal day in london. the places that where people came from that killed reflect the city. so many people will be coming to this city reflecting that as
11:19 am
well. we have 170 ambassadors and high commissioners from all over the world who are coming. of course we are an international city, we are the world city. there are 270 different nationalities living here, resident here, speaking 300 languages. so many people who were there, they are from here as well as vast numbers of visitors. we have huge crowds of visitors from all over the world, people want to come here, i hope they will continue to wa nt to here, i hope they will continue to want to come here. this is a small and random act. together we stand. that is a very important message. our society is very cohesive generally speaking. more than many other countries with this great diversity of people together. the day after the attack on the grass by the abbey, there was leaders of all
11:20 am
faiths, talking about the need to be together. that is a theme that you will be falling. very much so. we will be falling. very much so. we will have a muslim prayer. and one of the senior commanders from the met report on police who is also muslim. —— metropolitan police. we also have the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry. the royalfamily as cambridge and prince harry. the royal family as a focus of unity for us. royal family as a focus of unity for us. they will be meeting the families of the victim afterwards. that is an important part here. and also a quick word about people who survived the attack, some of them who are here, it is a difficult moment for them. i think it is very hard. people need to have moments when they can focus the sense of loss and grief and i hope we will do that. we are going to have a poignant moment after my address when a loan that cello will play. we
11:21 am
need to have a sense of hope. that'll be reflected. thank you so much. we have been battling a helicopter. it belongs to us and it is above westminster abbey. it is a beautiful, sunny day here in london. and a day when the focus of notjust the city, and this country, but the world will be on this abbey and on this service. an update on our headlines. britain hasjoined an update on our headlines. britain has joined the an update on our headlines. britain hasjoined the us an update on our headlines. britain has joined the us and an update on our headlines. britain hasjoined the us and france in condemning the syrian government for a suspected chemical attack yesterday. more than 70 people died, many of them children. the chief negotiator of the eu has told the european parliament that britain was mistaken to demand that talks on a
11:22 am
new trade deal should be held at the same time as talks on its withdrawal. and the duke and duchess of cambridge will attend a special service at westminster abbey for the victims of the westminster terror attack. let us catch up with the sport. olympic show—jumping champion nick skelton has announced his retirement from the sport. he is 59 and won gold at the brazilian games last summer. at london 2012 he helped great britain to a team gold medal. he said in a statement that the sport has given him more than he could have hoped for in the past a3 yea rs. jose mourinho has continued his criticism of his defender luke shaw. manchester united rescued a point against everton last night to extend their unbeaten run to 20 games but half of them have been drawn. a fourth place finish looks unlikely.
11:23 am
everton took the lead in the first—half through philjagielka with a good touch. zlatan ibrahimovic already had one goal disallowed for offside. it was mr reliable who equalised for manchester united with a penalty in the 9ath minute. jose mourinho was critical of substitute luke shaw. his performance was good but it was good because he was on my side. i was leading his performance. if he was leading his performance. if he was on the other side it would not be the same. it is not possible at this level. he has to grow up, mature and understand the game better. be more focused. speaking of criticism, the chairman of the football association, greg clark, has commented on sunderland manager david moyes about his remarks to a bbc female reporter. he was quoted
11:24 am
as saying it was regrettable, distasteful and showed a lack of respect. sunderland just delete publicly backed david moyes. —— sunderland yesterday. they lost 2—0 last night and remain at the bottom of the league table. chris woakes and ben duckett have been named as two out of five cricketers of the year. labour has failed the jewish community by not expelling ken livingstone from the party — according to the chief rabbi, ephraim mirvis. the former mayor of london was yesterday given a further one—year suspension for claiming hitler supported zionism in the 1930s. we have ads on strong words this morning from the deputy leader of the labour party, tom watson, who has stated that the things which aims us all that ken livingstone has not been expelled from the party. he
11:25 am
said the decision was incomprehensible and said the party is not living up to its commitment to have a zero tolerance approach to anti—semitism. he is not the only front bench person commenting on this. we also help from the shadow brexit secretary who said that ken livingstone should have been expeued livingstone should have been expelled and that there can be no place for this in our country. some strong reaction from the party. there was a flurry of tweets last night from backbenchers. ken livingstone has stood by what he said and stood by those comments that he made last year. there are some in thejewish community who support him and say this is an issue of freedom of speech. last night after the hearing ken livingstone was unrepentant and back on the airwaves again. ifi said it was unrepentant and back on the airwaves again. if i said it was a zionist, i would airwaves again. if i said it was a zionist, iwould not airwaves again. if i said it was a zionist, i would not have apologised, i would've as my doctor about the first signs of dementia.
11:26 am
he isa about the first signs of dementia. he is a man who launched and the jews all his life. he did a deal with the zionists. 66,000 german jews were moved to palestine and that they did not they would have died in the gas chambers all on worth 6 million others. instead of talking about the big issues any local election, we are talking about his bizarre fascination with the 19305 his bizarre fascination with the 1930s and it is damaging the labour party and its... he has form going back to mayor of london whether it was offensive remarks made to a jewish reporter at the evening standard suggesting that the jewish people were not voting for labour in more because they well wealthy. he makes in secondary remarks that offend the jewish makes in secondary remarks that offend thejewish community. ten yea rs offend thejewish community. ten years afterfinishing as offend thejewish community. ten years after finishing as mayor of london is then comes up on the doorstep of my constituency because he brings the labour party into disrepute. why did you ask me to come and campaign for you any general election? you did not come
11:27 am
anywhere near my constituency in the general election. it was one of the first things you did. yesterday was the launch of labour's local election campaign. it was overshadowed by the ken livingstone situation. officially the labour party says it acknowledges the result of the ruling and we have not held anything from jeremy corbyn. he has always said that the labour party stands against any form of anti—semitism in the party. there are fingers being pointed at the leadership that more needs to be done to tackle this issue within the party. we will have more reaction to that later. we will also have coverage of that service of remembrance for the victims of the terror attacks in the westminster starting at midday. it was a cold start this morning.
11:28 am
there was an grim contrast of the conditions were right. we are getting some beautiful sunshine to start the day. —— ground frost. the wind is quite strong and the north of the country, it can be blowing a gale. for most of us it is going to bea gale. for most of us it is going to be a try and bright day, if rather cloudy in the afternoon. not very warm because the wind is from the north—west. if we keep the sunshine which is likely in southern areas, it could be warm. if you are out for any length of time, bear that in mind. the clouds will be coming and going tonight. we will cease some ground frost again tomorrow morning. we will not have quite as much sunshine to start the day. lots of dry weather around. which it should be for the rest of the week. just
11:29 am
this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... britain hasjoined the us and france in backing a united nations resolution condemning syria for a suspected chemical attack which left at least 72 people dead. many of them were children. the eu's chief negotiator tells the european parliament that no deal on brexit would have very serious consequences for britain, and also for the european union. the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry will be attending what's being described a service of hope at westminster abbey, a fortnight after the attack near the houses of parliament. the deputy leader of the labour party, tom watson, has said the decision not to expel ken livingstone from the party over controversial remarks regarding adolf hitler and zionism "shames us all". the government has hinted that
11:30 am
drivers of diesel cars could get compensation, as cities impose new charges and restrictions to tackle air pollution across the uk. the un secretary general, ant nio guterres, has said the security council faces "a moment of truth" when it meets today to consider the suspected chemical attack on the syrian town of khan sheikhoun. more than 70 people were killed, many of them children. with me is paul schulte. he's a former director of arms control at the ministry of defence, and now an honorary professor at birmingham university. thank you forjoining us. a moment of truth, what do you think it will translate to? i think we are heading for a veto in the security council, and the secretary—general has said he is confident that the security council will live up to its responsibilities. that is historically questionable. quite recently, the russians and the
11:31 am
chinese vetoed attempts to put sanctions on syria. i suspect it will happen against quite of course, russia supports president assad in disarray and conflict. if that happens, what then, what can the international community do and what should it do? well, i doubt it will go to war, because it hasn't wanted to even before russia got involved. because of the consequences of being bob down anywhere in the middle east now look so unappealing —— being bogged down. now that russia is there, the chances of any kind of conflict with russian forces looked very worrying indeed, that is another reason. i suspect there will be continued name—calling, ritual state m e nts be continued name—calling, ritual statements about the unacceptability of these weapons, that is what the call cheap talk, there is a lot of cheap talk, but not very much action. the regime is already under the actions, there isn't very much more that can be done unless somebody wants to raise the level and takea
11:32 am
somebody wants to raise the level and take a greater risk. and that would be military action. it might be some kind of increased support for the relatively moderate syrian rubbles, that has been proposed for time to time but it hasn't happened. what is the state of the opposition? it is said that because of the lack of support for them in the face of what assad has been doing, a lot have been radicalised and joined the extremist groups, they have been pushed towards that without having any real support from the international community. that is one of the reasons, yes, the state of the opposition is fragmented and it is losing. and that i think it's how you have to understand this event. it seems to be a very deliberate signal by the syrian regime that we are winning, and we don't care, we're going to do what we need to do to terminate the civil war on our terms, understand this and
11:33 am
appreciate that we don't think we are going to be stopped. last week, president trump said that forcing president trump said that forcing president assad out of part is no longer a priority for the american government, —— out of power. the priority is tackling is. historians in future will trace possible connections between that statement and the syrian decision to use chemical bombs the next week. chemical bombs have been used though for some time. and it is not always picked up by observers. it doesn't get the level of coverage. i mean, this has had a lot of coverage because of the number of people who have died. this seems to have been a deliberate operational decision. taken in full knowledge that it would have wider consequences. if you were bombing a town with sarin now, you have to figure it would get reported. so if they decide to do thatis reported. so if they decide to do that is because they are quite happy with the message that that sense. because big mother russia will
11:34 am
protect them in the security council. —— big brother russia. we are ina council. —— big brother russia. we are in a period of post—truth politics. as russia today says, you should question everything, nothing is true, everything is possible. they know that the russians and the iranians or in full support on this, and the chinese tend to vote with the russians. a third of the world will say no. the facts are not the fa cts , will say no. the facts are not the facts, it didn't happen this way, we see a different story. and that is pa rt see a different story. and that is part of the reality we now have to think about on this and all future crises. paul schulte, thank you. four british muslim leaders are meeting pope francis at the vatican this morning in an effort to improve interfaith dialogue between islam and the roman catholic church. the delegation is being led by the archbishop of westminster, cardinal vincent nichols. from rome, our religious affairs correspondent martin bashir reports. it has been an extraordinary morning here in rome. four british imams — two sunni, two shia, from birmingham, glasgow, london and leicester —
11:35 am
were brought here by icardi cardinal vincent nichols, the archbishop of westminster, to develop interfaith relations. and we, the bbc, were granted access to this private audience with the pope. and it was, as i say, an extraordinary moment, where the imams were able to express their own feelings towards the pope. and the pope was able to express his own sense of collegiality and friendship with islam. they talked about the recent incident in westminster, and they also shared their determination to build interfaith dialogue and community in britain into the future. so it has been an extraordinary morning. they'll be having lunch in a moment at the english college before they wrap up their day and travel back to the uk. and i believe they'll do that this evening as people who really feel that this hasn'tjust been a symbolic moment of meeting, but one of real substance as well.
11:36 am
martin bashir reporting. let's return to the news that the jewish community has criticised the labour party for not expelling ken livingstone from the party. the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis said labour has failed the jewish community. the board of deputies of britishjewsalso condemned the party's decision. joining me now isjonathan arkush, president of the board of deputies of britishjews. hello, good morning. what you about the situation? the labour party tribunal found ken livingstone guilty of conduct that was grossly detrimental to the party. so the question we are asking is why he wasn't expelled. what do you think can and should be done now?“ wasn't expelled. what do you think can and should be done now? if you give someone a slap on the wrist for such gross behaviour, you're really sending a signal that you don't
11:37 am
treat it very seriously. and what can be done now, i assume, there are internal party processes to rectify it. but some of the damage is already done. i simply cannot understand the basis of the tribunal‘s decision, nor can sir keir starmer, and nor can tom watson, figures at top of the labour party. what about the figure right at the top was mike tom watson is the deputy leader, what aboutjeremy corbyn? what about jeremy corbyn. we are waiting to hear, the silence is beginning to be deafening. what would you like him to do or say? well, i think that any leader of a party should realise that having such a controversial and divisive figure as ken livingstone, who not only made offensive statements but he keeps on making them, even on the day of the hearing, during the hearing, after the hearing, he keeps on repeating them. he keeps repeating exactly the same conduct
11:38 am
thatis repeating exactly the same conduct that is grossly detrimental to the party. why would you want such a person inside? we will talk more about the specifics of the comments. in terms of german corbyn, why do you think he is not coming out and saying anything? i suppose he is locked in a room with his advisers wondering what to do. but i would like to see a very clear signal coming from the top of the labour party that they take anti—semitism seriously —— jeremy corbyn. at the moment, i have to say, we are not getting get. and if you don't get it? it will be more of the same, ongoing, very troubling signal that the labour party doesn't care about anti—semitism, doesn't treat it in the same way as it should be treating all forms of racism, that is sending a signal to the country about problems within the party, and sending a very strong signal to the jewish community as well. is there evidence thatjerusalem was of the
11:39 am
labour party are giving up their own bishop as a result —— jewish mambo is of the labour party? lord leavy said he was seriously thinking of it. people saying on social media they have resigned. the polling figures tell the story. jewish people are deserting the party in d roves. of people are deserting the party in droves. of course it is not limited tojudge people. this is much more serious than labour. because good people out there do not want to see racism within senior figures in one of our major political parties. and quite understandably they are saying they want out. do you have faith in jeremy corbyn to deal with this? thus far i have to say, no. it has taken one year to bring this disciplinary tribunal along. we asked repeatedly why it was taking so asked repeatedly why it was taking so long. and now that it has happened, it has on the one hand found livingstone guilty, and on the other it has opposed a derisory penalty —— imposed. my faith is being sorely tested. on what he said
11:40 am
committee says he has not said anything untrue, he is not anti—semitic. he said, i apologise the offence caused by the labour mps who lied and said that i said that hitler was a zionist. the comments that he made referred to an agreement that was signed by the not so agreement that was signed by the not so government that allowed the relocation of some dues to palestine in 1933 -- relocation of some dues to palestine in 1933 —— signed by the nazi government that allowed the relocation of some jews. what government that allowed the relocation of somejews. what do you say about that? he says it is a fa ct? say about that? he says it is a fact? leading historians, specialists in the field, have declared what he said to be untrue ora declared what he said to be untrue or a distortion, or, declared what he said to be untrue ora distortion, or, in declared what he said to be untrue or a distortion, or, in the words of one leading academic in london, risible. they have said, they are the expert, i am not a history. they have said what he has said is grossly distorted and untrue. you cannot reduce adolf hitler to a sound bite. but in a way this is now
11:41 am
not the relevant question. the labour party tribunal has found that what he has said was grossly detrimental to the party. what impact does this have in the real world forjewish people? is people are world forjewish people? is people a re left world forjewish people? is people are left wondering —— jewish people are left wondering —— jewish people a re left are left wondering —— jewish people are left wondering —— jewish people are left wondering that why is it that a major political party is obsessing about the world's only jewish state? haven't we got bigger problems to concern ourselves with — brexit, the economy, the way our country is going, and yet, persistently, within political parties, i'm sorry to say, especially labour, the issue of israel keeps on surfacing. and criticism is directed about israel and discourse is allowed about israel that doesn't happen with any other country. and we ask why. jonathan arkush, thank you. drivers of diesel cars,
11:42 am
who are facing new charges and restrictions in cities across the uk, could receive compensation. and ultralow emission zone will becoming into force in london in april 2019, with a daily fee for some drivers expected to be rolled out in other cities. the government is expected to reveal a new plan to improve air quality later this month, and this morning there are hints it could include extra support for affected motorists. alexandra mackenzie reports. theresa may has said she will take into account that other governments have encouraged people to buy diesel ca rs. when buying a new car, do you go diesel or petrol? it can be confusing, and is possibly a bit of a gamble. a lower vehicle tax introduced by the then chancellor gordon brown has encouraged motorists to opt for diesel. it is regarded as more economical and, in terms of carbon dioxide emissions, less harmful. here is a diesel car being tested. it meets the required standard. but there is increasing concern that diesel cars omit dangerous levels of nitrogen dioxide,
11:43 am
thought to have caused thousands of premature deaths in the uk. air pollution limits have been repeatedly exceeded in places, including birmingham, leeds, glasgow and london. tell me what this is! it's a poster about air pollution. the london mayor described the city's air as lethal. in fresh proposals, he says all but the newest diesel cars will face a charge to drive in the city's ultra—low emission zone. the prime minister appeared to be offering help for diesel owners. she told reporters... the government has required to produce a new air quality plant later this month. it comes after the european commission sent a final warning over breaches of legal air pollution limits in the uk. alexandra mackenzie, bbc news.
11:44 am
in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour. but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live... britain hasjoined the us and france in backing a united nations resolution condemning syria for a suspected chemical attack which left at least 72 people dead. many of them were children. the eu's chief negotiator tells the european parliament that no deal on brexit would have very serious consequences for britain, and also for the european union. it has said that britain was mistaken to demand that talks on a new trade deal were to be held at the same time as talks on withdrawal. the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry will be attending what's being described a service of hope at westminster abbey, a fortnight after the attack near the houses of parliament. in the business news... march was a record month for the uk's new car market, as many motorists seized the opportunity to buy before sweeping tax changes were introduced. more than 562,000 new cars were registered last month, according to the society
11:45 am
of motor manufacturers and traders. that's up by more than 8% compared with march 2016, and is the largest monthly total recorded by the industry. the uk's services sector continued to expand last month, according to a closely—watched survey from markit cips of purchasing managers. it by the analysts‘ expectations. —— it beat the analysts‘. but the report also showed that companies raised their selling prices at the fastest pace since 2008, a sign that inflation may rise more than the 3% expected by many forecasters this year. lloyds has named 100 branches which are due to close after a previously announced restructuring plan. they include 22 halifax and 2a bank of scotla nd include 22 halifax and 2a bank of scotland branches. 200 jobs will go, according to the knight union. —— are you knight union. mps are calling for more action by british businesses on curbing
11:46 am
excessive executive pay and improving the way companies are run. the corporate governance report from the business, energy and industrial strategy committee comes in the aftermath of the sports direct and bhs inquiries, and calls for companies to do more to regain trust. iain wright mp chairs the committee. i asked him what he made of the decision by prime minister theresa may to drop the proposal for employees to be mandatory on boards. when theresa may came into office, she talked some really strong words about corporate governance, how there was a disconnect between business and society. and she was absolutely right. but by the time the corporate governance green paper came out just before christmas, those proposals had been watered down considerably. now, we don‘t believe on the select committee that a one—size—fits—all approach to corporate governance is the right one. however, having that employee engagement, having that long—term and strategic view that workers can provide, we think are a positive step for corporate governance. and so the idea that you could have workers on boards, providing that strategic challenge, thinking about the long—term views, is a positive one. british economic productivity grew
11:47 am
at its fastest rate in more than a year in the final three months of 2016, though the pace of growth remained well below its average before the financial crisis. according to the the office for national statistics, output per hour rose by 0.a% in the fourth quarter of 2016 to give a year—on—year growth rate of 1.2% — both the fastest rates since the three months tojune 2015. my colleague ben thompson has been out and about in devon looking at how we could be working smarter to boost economic output. welcome to devon. we are talking about how the uk can solve what is known as the productivity puzzle. how do we get businesses here to be more productive without simply asking workers to do a bit more, work order? it is about getting them to work a bit smarter, too. this is exactly what they have been doing at this plant. barry is the boss, good
11:48 am
morning. how do you improve productivity? we are surrounded by a lot of people here, but also machines. is it about buying robots to do the job? buying robots helps, but it takes time. it is about doing things differently. automation, robot loading is one thing. new software programming, as you have seen on some software programming, as you have seen on some of the bigger machines, reduces cycle time. it's about, how do we do things quicker? rather than all of that time being used up doing relatively mundane tasks like loading machines, you can now deploy the staff to do betterjobs that will add more value to the business. exactly. in the past, operators would have been loading machines. we have now moved on. with the robots doing the basic operations, the machines have been up skills, we are telling thing the more, they are programming robots and machines, they are decision—making as well, making quicker decisions to help us grow. that has how you improve your
11:49 am
productivity. thank you. that is the challenge that businesses here have. how do you improve productivity without asking people just to do more? it is about using what you have got and using it more smartly. that is important for all of us, because rising productivity should mean rising wages. rising wages means a rise in standards of living. there is a worry that the uk has fallen way down the league table as forest productivity is concerned. we are now behind france, germany and the united states. getting productivity back up and solving what is known as the productivity puzzle could be absolutely vital. let‘s move to some other business stories we are following today... workers at car giant bmw are to stage a series of eight 2a—hour strikes from later this month in a dispute over pensions. members of unite will walk out at different locations from april 19th until may the 2ath, following a huge vote in favour of industrial action. unite said the strikes will "significantly disrupt" production of cars including the mini. house—builder galliford try has given up its pursuit of rival
11:50 am
bovis homes just a week after fellow suitor redrow walked away from the takeover tussle. the move leaves bovis without any potential deals on the table, but bovis says it‘s put faith in new leadership — separately announcing the appointment of former galliford boss greg fitzgerald as its new chief executive. iceland‘s parliament has presented a bill to enshrine in law equal pay for women and men across the public and private sector. if passed, the bill would require all employers with over 25 staff to prove they offer equal pay to all employees. the law would be a world first and would come into effect from january. here‘s how the markets are getting on. shares in britain‘s blue—chip index, the ftse100, have risen slightly, extending yesterday‘s gains. it is mainly mining shares and oils docks which have led the mini rally. it is
11:51 am
only up by 0.8%. it does still mean that the ftse100 is outperforming european indexes such as the backs. we believe there is still quite a lot of uncertainty around, and the a level of nervousness ahead of tomorrow‘s visit between president trump and china‘s xijinping. tomorrow‘s visit between president trump and china‘s xi jinping. the tomorrow‘s visit between president trump and china‘s xijinping. the us president has vowed to take a hard line on countries such as china which have a large trade surplus with the us. sterling hasjumped after the services sector survey beat forecasts. that‘s all the business news. the duke and duchess of cambridge or attending a service of hope and reconciliation for the victims of last month‘s westminster attack. around 2000 people are expected to attend the service at westminster abbey. we can go live to my colleague simon mccoy, who is there. simon? joanne, thank you. they are
11:52 am
calling it a service of hope. the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry will be arriving just before midday. the service is expected to take about 50 minutes. also in the congregation, members of the emergency services who performed so valiantly that day. just a couple of hundred yards away from where we are standing right now. with me is our news correspondent sangita myska. a lot of people will perhaps be surprised that we are having the service so soon, just two weeks, after this attack. in a way, simon, the point of this service is three to bring people together. i was speaking to representatives of westminster abbey, they were saying that whilst this is obviously called two we e ks that whilst this is obviously called two weeks after the attack, it has been sometime in the planning. the dean of the abbey of course took his position upjust dean of the abbey of course took his position up just after the 7/7 tax in 2005. i am told it was shortly after that —— the 7/7 attacks. it
11:53 am
was called to go down to scotland ya rd was called to go down to scotland yard here in britain, including hindus, muslims, dojews and so on. they want to find ways to country to come together and ensure that there would be a spirit of community following any kind of attack in the future. and having spoken to somebody at the abbey, they were saying, look, it was pretty clear about the chances were that the attackers may well come from the islamic faith. and it was really a central guiding force amongst all of the faith representatives in that working group that what they wanted was for the bold come together regardless of their creed or their background. two weeks ago, march 22, at 2:a0pm, the lives of so many people were changed just yards from where we stand. just remind us, because it was 82 seconds, wasn‘t it? it certainly was. it was about 2:40pm in the afternoon, the police
11:54 am
and the ambulance service got those first calls saying there had been a major incident on westminster bridge. very quickly we could see pictures appearing on social media, it was very clear that something quite terrible had happened. what we understood at that point was that ceuta had driven on to the footpath “ a car ceuta had driven on to the footpath —— a car had driven. people had been mown down by the driver of that car. there were a number of casualties, and of course the fatalities, who we will remember at the service at midday. the same car drove along the bridge straight towards the palace of westminster, drove into the fence. the man that we now know as khalid masood came out of the car brandishing two lives. he made his way into palace yard and attacked the police officer. that police officer is one of those who is being remembered today, pc keith palmer. a8 years old. he was killed as he tried to stop khalid masood outside
11:55 am
the houses of parliament. and an armed member of the parliamentary diplomatic protection squad. he had been wearing a body armour vest issued as routine to metropolitan police officers. he had a five—year—old daughter, amy, who we are expecting to attend today‘s ceremony. hejoined the are expecting to attend today‘s ceremony. he joined the diplomatic command last year after serving in the territorial support group. also being remembered today, aysha frade, aa years old. she had been walking across westminster bridge to pick up her two young daughters from school when she was killed. a coroner was told she had suffered head and chest injuries. she too died at the scene. a british national, she worked at administration at the nearby sixth form college. the principal regarded her as a highly regarded and loved member of staff, saying she would be deeply missed by all. the third victim, from the united states, kurt
11:56 am
cochran, 5a, from utah. he was in london as part of a holiday celebrating 25 years of marriage to melissa, who was seriously injured. indeed, in the last few minutes, melissa cochran has arrived at westminster abbey to attend this service. it was the couple‘s first trip abroad. they were also visiting melissa‘s parents who work on a church ofjesus melissa‘s parents who work on a church of jesus christ melissa‘s parents who work on a church ofjesus christ of latter—day things mission. they had been due to return the day after the attack —— of latter—day saints. leslie rhodes, from clapham in south london, thought to be visiting the hospital when he was hit by the car driven by khalid masood. a retired window cleaner, he was taken to kings couege cleaner, he was taken to kings college hospital and by the following day. the opening of an inquest into the death was told he had died from a head injury. they will be at the heart of this service today. thoughts of them. if we take you inside the abbey now. the
11:57 am
dignitaries, many of them from all over the world, it is worth making the point once again that ambassadors from nearly 200 countries are represented here today, with not just countries are represented here today, with notjust the dead but those injured coming from all over the world — the united states, remainiac, france, south korea, italy, china, australia —— romania. portugal, germany, poland and ireland. underlining that this city a tt ra cts ireland. underlining that this city attracts those from everywhere. sadiq khan, the mayor of london, next to stephen lamport. they now await the arrival of the duke and duchess of cambridge. and other dignitaries. when the duke and duchess arrived they will take a brief pause,
11:58 am
alongside prince harry, and lay a wreath at the memorial before working their way into westminster abbey where they will be presented to members of the clergy of the abbey and other dignitaries. and it is worth bearing in mind that, broadly speaking, there are two parts of this service. one of course is reflection and remembrance and prayers for the dead and the injured. but also, the dean it this morning was very injured. but also, the dean it this morning was very keen to point out that this is being called a service of hope. what he wants to do is reflect what he saw as a positive outcome, which was that the communities in britain came together, and we saw a number of those situations in which people came together, notably trafalgar square. there was a hand written not attract
11:59 am
—— attached to the note. pc palmer and all those who served the community so violently, your legacy is our way of life. the duke also paid a private visit to saint thomas ‘s hospital to thank staff for the life—saving efforts. we expect the royal family to meet some of the victims after the service. in terms of the tenor of this service, the dean of westminster saying that whilst the attack was both vicious and senseless, and there is little explanation for it, there was no other way to deal with that, he said. apart from creating a wall of solidarity between the communities. representatives from the jewish community, the hindu community, and
12:00 pm
the muslim community have been invited here to come together at this service of hope. one of the informal moments of this service as the dean of westminster chats to members of the royal family before this service gets underway. as well as this being a service of hope, it is one of reconciliation. the dean is one of reconciliation. the dean is saying that he wants the focus to be that in this city, one of the brazilian cities —— the busiest cities in the world, we are all together. the guests are attending by invitation only. the service will be conducted by the very reverend john hall, the dean of westminster. dignitaries, representatives of the emergency services, survivors and families of the victims. the home secretary amber rudd will be representing the prime minister who
12:01 pm
is abroad at the moment in saudi arabia. also the acting commissioner of the metropolitan police force, craig mackey. and as we saw earlier, the mayor of london city can will also be attending. —— sadiq khan. the london mayor, sadiq khan, we‘ll see some words during this service. among those being introduced is the high sheriff of greater london, the
12:02 pm
lord lieutenant of greater london, the representative of the lord mayor of london. and also being introduced is lord fowler, the lord speaker. today‘s service is being written by the reverend christopher stoltz. it will last about a5 minutes from the beginning to the end. in that, john hall will be setting out why the servers with being hall —— being held and who is being remembered. those four people who were killed in the attack. and 50 people injured who are still being treated for their injuries in hospitals around london. they will be two well—known hymns. the duke and justice of cambridge,
12:03 pm
the royal highness prince henry of wales, they have been deceived by the dean of westminster. —— the duke and duchess of cambridge. and the choir walk up the aisle for the start of the service. the service of hope following the terrorist attack in london. as on so many events of national importance, westminster abbey as the focus of the nation‘s thoughts and prayers. it is a multi—faith service
12:04 pm
at the heart of what we are seeing today. candles will be lit. just a few hundred yards from where the attacks took place, they will look to seek for justice and attacks took place, they will look to seek forjustice and to seek peace. and the focus on the diverse nature of society. the players are to protect the country from the forces of division and hatred. the mayor of london, rabbijulia neuberger, we‘ll do some readings. there will also be a muslim text read out. aysha frade, kurt cochran, leslie rhodes, keith palmer, their families and friends,
12:05 pm
and all those who were injured. we commend them to the care and keeping of almighty god. we give thanks for the vigilance and dedication of the police and security services, and we pray for them in their vital work of keeping our communities and nations safe from terror and random violence. we pray today for the communities of our united kingdom, so rich in their diversity, that we may all celebrate what each contributes and that we may live in harmony. at a time of sorrow, a time when we are tempted
12:06 pm
to despair, may we find hope. the special service choir and congregation will now sing our first team. —— ourfirst hymn. # dear —— ourfirst hymn. # dear lord and father of mankind # forgive our foolish ways! # re—clothe us in our rightful mind # in purer lives thy service find # in deeper reverence praise # in simple trust like theirs who heard
12:07 pm
# beside the syrian sea # the gracious calling of the lord # let us, like them, without a word # rise up and follow thee # 0 sabbath rest by galilee! # 0 calm of hills above # wherejesus knelt to share with thee # the silence of eternity
12:08 pm
# interpreted by love! # drop thy still dews of quietness # till all our strivings cease # take from our souls the strain and stress # and let our ordered lives confess # the beauty of thy peace # breathe through the heats of our desire
12:09 pm
# thy coolness and thy balm # let sense be dumb, let flesh retire # speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire # 0 still small voice of calm! now the home secretary will bring a message of hope out of suffering from the book ofjeremiah. thus says the lord,
12:10 pm
a voice is heard in ramah, lamentation and bitter weeping. rachel is weeping for her children. she refuses to be comforted for her children, because they are no more. thus says the lord, keep your voice from weeping, and your eyes from tears, for there is a reward for your work. says the lord, they shall come back from the land of the enemy, there is hope for yourfuture. says the lord, your children shall come back to their own country. # out of the deep have i called unto thee, 0 lord
12:11 pm
# lord, hear my voice # 0 let thine ears consider well the voice of my complaint # if thou, lord, wilt be extreme to mark what is done amiss # 0 lord, who may abide it? # for there is mercy with thee # therefore shalt thou be feared # i look for the lord, my soul doth wait for him. # in his word is my trust. # my soul fleeth unto the lord.
12:12 pm
# before the morning watch, i say, before the morning watch # 0 israel, trust in the lord, for with the lord there is mercy # and with him is plenteous redemption # and he shall redeem israel from all his sins # glory be to the father, and to the son, and to the holy ghost # as it was in the beginning is now and ever shall be # world without end
12:13 pm
# amen. now the second reading from st luke's read by his royal highness, the duke of cambridge. "and who is my neighbour?" jesus replied, "a man was going down from jerusalem to jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead."
12:14 pm
now by chance a priest was going down that road, and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. so likewise a levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. but a samaritan while travelling came near him, and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. he went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. the next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, "take care of him, and when i come back,
12:15 pm
i will repay you whatever more you spend." which of these three, do you think, was a neighbour to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers? he said, "the one who showed him mercy." jesus said to him, "go and do likewise." the choir will now sing a song of the newjerusalem from revelation chapter 20 one. choir sings: a song of the newjerusalem
12:16 pm
and now the address from the dean of westminster, the very reverened dr john hall. the dean of westminster will now
12:17 pm
address the congregation. in the name of the father and of the son and of the holy spirit, amen. no man is an island entire of itself, wrote john no man is an island entire of itself, wrotejohn donne, in 162a. any man‘s death diminishes me because i am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls. it tolls for thee. so we are all affected by the
12:18 pm
attack a fortnight ago on westminster bridge, and at the gates of the palace of westminster, and we are all left bewildered and disturbed. but our sense of loss and diminishment is pale by comparison with that of the families of those who died. aysha frade, kurt cochran, leslie rhodes on the bridge. and police constable keith palmer on duty at the gates of parliament. and all those who were injured. our hearts go out to them in sympathy and prayer and love. anyone who has walked on westminster bridge or in parliament square in recent days has seen parliament square in recent days has seen bunches of flowers in row upon row in the square, and tied to the
12:19 pm
bmp row in the square, and tied to the lamp posts on the bridge. candles have been lit and messages left. m essa g es of have been lit and messages left. messages of love and support. m essa g es messages of love and support. messages too of determination and defiance in the face of evil and terror. messages from younger and older people, friends and former collea g u es older people, friends and former colleagues of those who were killed. and simple statements of courage. we are not afraid. and we stand together. in his devotions on emergent occasions, john donne, a poet and dean of st paul‘s cathedral, stressed that our companionship, our mutual involvement and dependency is not within our own nation alone. he
12:20 pm
mentioned europe as a whole, but today we would recognise our common citizenship more widely. london is a world city. with visitors from every country on the planet and residents drawn from 270 nationalities, and speaking 300 languages. those killed and injured included londoners, but also people from the united states of america, from romania, france, south korea, italy, china, australia, greece, portugal, germany, poland and ireland. what happened a fortnight ago leaves us bewildered. what could possibly motivate a man to hire a car and
12:21 pm
ta ke motivate a man to hire a car and take it from birmingham to brighton to london and then drive it fast at people he had never met, couldn‘t possibly know, against whom he had no personal grudge, no reason to hate them, and then run at the gates of the palace of westminster to cause another death? it seems likely that we shall never know. no doubt, it was an imitation of the attacks in nice —— nice anne boleyn, but what on earth did he hope to achieve? —— nice and berlin. such random acts of aggression are nothing new. we are reminded of the death of these earlier —— fusilier lee rigby, the bomb attacks on the underground and the london buses in
12:22 pm
2005, and so much more here in earlier terror campaigns. and we are conscious of the determined and committed protection offered by the police and security services. even so, police and security services. even so, every police and security services. even so, every act of aggression leaves us so, every act of aggression leaves us disturbed and, somehow, diminished. our first lesson reminded ourfirst lesson reminded us of the suffering of the people ofjudea. it referred to being sacked. they were taken into exile it babylon itself, about 50 miles or so of modern baghdad. the psalm tells us how they felt, by the waters of babylon, we sat down and wept, when we remembered you, owe jerds. sat down and wept, when we
12:23 pm
remembered you, owejerds. — other jerusalem. they are suffering lasted and is reflected in the suffering of those in iraq and syria in our own day of the millions of people dispossessed and living in poverty and fear in refugee camps or in their own homes, but deprived of everything we‘re accustomed to rely on for our own health and welfare. we weep for the violence. for the hatred. for the loss of life. for all that divides and spoils our world. it was not meant to be like this. it should not be like this. violence and hatred are not the answer. the best—known storyjesus
12:24 pm
told, the pa rabole answer. the best—known storyjesus told, the parabole of the good samaritan has a message for us. at first sight it seems quite simple — a man has been mugged and left half dead by the roadside. two people hurry past, leaving him to find for himself. not apparently caring about himself. not apparently caring about him at all. one man, by contrast, stops. and does whatever he can, in firstaid, stops. and does whatever he can, in first aid, pouring on oil and wine to cleanse the man‘s wounds. and then bandaging him. he takes him to an inn and looked after him until the next day. then he pays the inn keeper to care for him, promising to come back and cover the cost of any further help. that‘s all good in
12:25 pm
itself but the man who cares for the one who has been mugged is not of the same faith or nationality as him. infact, the the same faith or nationality as him. in fact, the two communities, the dues and the samaritans have been enemies for centuries and despise and indeed hate one another. that enmity is o no bar to the samaritan doing a good deed for the jew. jesus praises the good samaritan. there is another twist to jesus‘ story. the people who should have been the first responders. the ones who walked past quickly were of the same faith and nationality of the same faith and nationality of the injured man. but they did nothing. they were bound by their religious duties not to touch a dead body and they feared the man was
12:26 pm
dead. jesus condemns them. condemns them for their lack of comoon decency. they‘ve failed the test of compassion and love, the test of mercy, whichjesus rates far more highly than adherence to narrow religious conventions. in this and in other ways, during his ministry on earth, jesus leads us to leap over the barriers that divide us, whatever they are. and to reach out in brotherly and sisterly love to those of other faiths and nationalities. we have called this a service of hope and despite the horror of a random killing and hatred shown two weeks ago today, there is much for which we can be thankful. and much to offer us hope.
12:27 pm
the day after the westminster attacks, muslim, jewish, christian and other faith leaders condemned the violence and together stated that such aggressive and destructive acts, against innocent victims, were no part of islam or any of the world faiths. later a great concourse of people gathered at trafalgar square to witness a quiet demonstration of solidarity between the faith communities that make up our city and nation. the next day the archbishops of canterbury and westminster stood with the chief rabbi and leading shia and sunni clerics just outside the abbey, to demonstrate the mutual respect of the three abrahamic faiths and their
12:28 pm
solidarity as leaders and four days later, 100 women, most of them muslim, formed a human chain on westminster bridge. we stand together. just as in this service the world faiths are represented and will pray together. above all, for the gift of hope. in a few moments we shall light candles and make an act of commitment. our prayer and commitment is to live together peacefully and respectfully, rich in our diversity and to sing together in harmony. cellist natalie clein is in the nave
12:29 pm
and will play song of the birds. it is her own arrangement, a traditional catalan soul. —— tsonga. music: song of the birds performed by natalie clein. this is now the moment of
12:30 pm
togetherness, celebrated by candlelight. # i will lift up mine eyes unto the hills # from whence cometh my help? # my help cometh even from the lord, who hath made heaven and earth # he will not suffer thy foot to be moved # and he that keepeth thee will not sleep # behold, he that keepeth israel shall neither slumber nor sleep # the lord himself is thy keeper
12:31 pm
# the lord is thy defence upon thy right hand # so that the sun shall not burn thee by day # neither the moon by night # the lord shall preserve thee from all evil # yea, it is even he that shall keep thy soul # the lord shall preserve thy going out and thy coming in # from this time forth for evermore. # #as it # as it was in the beginning, as now and ever shall be. # amen.
12:32 pm
the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it. 0 god, who through the mighty resurrection of your sonjesus christ has delivered us from the power of darkness and brought us into the light of your kingdom. grant that as he was raised from the dead by the glory of the father, so we also may walk in newness of life and seek those things that are above, where you live and reign with the father and the holy spirit, one god, world without end. amen. together let us affirm our shared humanity and our resolve to bring light and life to all. we will pursue justice.
12:33 pm
we will show mercy. we will seek peace. in the name of almighty god, our creator, redeemer, and sustainer, and in remembrance of those who have died or been injured, let us pray for the gifts of healing and peace. in the name of god, the most gracious, the most merciful. 0 god, we raise our hands in prayer today. we ask you for your mercy and your blessing at and on this gathering.
12:34 pm
we ask you to bless the souls of those innocent people who lost their lives in the terrorist attack on march 22nd. we ask you to grant peace, comfort and patience to their grieving families, friends and loved ones at this difficult time. we ask you to keep our city and country safe and secure always. and we ask you to safeguard and strengthen the bonds of unity and friendship between our diverse communities, and to protect us from the forces of division and hatred always. grant us peace, goodness, and blessing. life, grace and kindness. justice and mercy. source of our life, bless us all together with the light of your presence, for in the light of your presence, you give us, our living god,
12:35 pm
law and life, love and kindness, justice and mercy, blessing and peace. and in your eyes, it is good to bless all your people with the strength to make peace. blessed are you, god, blessing your peoples with peace. people are either your brothers in faith or similar to you in humanity. we are constantly reminded in the islamic teachings of the prophet and the imams that the best of muslims is one who utters beautiful words, who does virtuous deeds, who gives to the poor, who helps the needy, and protects the weak.
12:36 pm
first god almighty created the light, and all beings. so who is good and who is bad? 0 people and siblings of destiny, do not wonder, deluded by doubt. the creation is in the creator, and the creator is in the creator, and the creator is in the creation. take pervaded and permeating all places. be present 0 merciful god almighty and protect us so that we, while wearied by the changes and chances of this fleeting world, may repose
12:37 pm
upon your eternal changelessness, through jesus christ upon your eternal changelessness, throuthesus christ our lord. lord, make us channels of your peace. where there is hatred let us bring your love. where there is injury, your pardon, lord. where there is doubt, faith. make us channels of your peace. where there is despair in life, let us bring hope. where there is darkness, only light. and where there is sadness, everjoy. longing for god‘s kingdom ofjustice,
12:38 pm
mercy, and peace, let us pray as jesus christ has taught us — our father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. give us this day our daily bread. and forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. for thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. amen. the congregation will now sing our final hymn. it is a celebration of love and life. # now thank we all our god
12:39 pm
# with heart and hands and voices # who wondrous things hath done # in whom his world rejoices # who from our mother‘s arms # hath blessed us on our way # with countless gifts of love # and still is ours today # 0 may this bounteous god # through all our life be near us # with everjoyful hearts # and bless d peace to cheer us
12:40 pm
# and keep us in his grace # and guide us when perplexed # and free us from all ills # in this world and the next # all praise and thanks to god # the father now be given # the son, and him who reigns # with them in highest heaven # the one eternal god # whom earth and heaven adore
12:41 pm
# for thus it was, is now # and shall be evermore # amen. # god grant to the living, grace. to the departed, rest. to the church, the queen, the commonwealth, and all mankind, peace and concord. and to us sinners, life everlasting. and the blessing of god almighty, the father, the son, and the holy spirit, be among you and remain with you always.
12:42 pm
amen. # god save our gracious queen # long live our noble queen # god save the queen # send her victorious # happy and glorious # long to reign over us # god save the queen. # the royal family are moving to the west end of the abbey church, away
12:43 pm
from the cameras. the princes will be meeting some of those here today who are remembering loved ones who we re who are remembering loved ones who were lost in that attack of two weeks ago. sangita myska, news correspondent, is here with me. some remarkable words from the dean during his address. indeed, simon. interesting to note that he sought to seek a balance between remembrance of those who lost their lives and the injured. he was also offering a reflection on what he described as a senseless, violent attack. i think towards the end an attempt to find hope, and a way of making sense of those events. he said at one point, we weep for the violence, for the hatred, for the loss of life, for all that divides and spoils our world. it was not meant to be like this, it should not be like this, violence and hatred are not the answer. i think that is
12:44 pm
are not the answer. i think that is a feeling that was reflected on the day of the attack itself, and then in the days afterwards. and then he went all in his address, i think to try and address how we might look at the events in retrospect. we have called this a service of hope, he said, and despite the horror of the random killing and hatred shown two weeks ago today, just a few hundred meters away from where you are in dire standing now, there is much for which we can be thankful. —— you and iare standing. which we can be thankful. —— you and i are standing. he went on to talk about how people came together in the days after the attack. he talked about how muslims, jews, christians and other faith leaders condemned the violence almost immediately. he talked of how ordinary people got together in trafalgar square to witness a quiet demonstration of solidarity. he has talked about that concrete wall of solidarity between the communities. he says he wants people to come together, that‘s the
12:45 pm
only way to ensure that terrorism does not win. he went on to talk about the archbishop... he asked the question which everybody in this service has been asking which is, why? why did happen‘s he said we may never know. that's right, at one point he was describing the motivations of the attack and saying, there were none, this was senseless. there was no reason to hate, there was no reason for violence. what we must look for is what little hope there is, that is about the co—operation between all communities and all creeds after this. sangita myska, thank you. is this. sangita myska, thank you. is this service draws to a close, members of the emergency services, and first responders who were first on the scenes after the killings, some of those injured and of course the relatives who were murdered in that terror attack will shortly be meeting the duke of cambridge, after what has been a remarkable service. a service of hope, it was described
12:46 pm
as, a service of reconciliation, and as, a service of reconciliation, and a service, the aim of which was to bring comfort to those who still have very warm memories just two weeks after that attack just a couple of hundred yards away from where i‘m standing —— very war memories. now it is time for the weather with helen willetts. we will see little rain but we will have cloud. it has been promising today. the cloud is coming in from the north and west. it will ease for the north and west. it will ease for the northern isles and the showers will taper off. just the odd shower elsewhere. 11—1a but pleasant in the strengthening sunshine. the strength of the sun at the moment is equivalent to late august of that is to note if you
12:47 pm
12:48 pm
12:49 pm
12:50 pm
12:51 pm
12:52 pm
12:53 pm
12:54 pm
12:55 pm
12:56 pm
12:57 pm
12:58 pm
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
1:01 pm

55 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on